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Tag Archive 'Women’s Suffrage'

Evanston Women and the 19th is a web resource that was introduced by the Evanston Women’s History Project last fall. The information on the collections is valuable, and recent updates make the materials more interactive and engaging for visitors. These updates include: a new contextual timeline that opens the exhibit, offering visitors a view of […]

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The Evanston Women’s History Project is excited to unveil a new web resource that will highlight the contributions Evanston women and organizations made to making the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, removing gender restrictions on voting, possible. People today associate this accomplishment with well-known figures like Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, but there […]

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August 26, 2010 marks the 90th anniversary of women achieving the right to vote in national elections!  Evanston women played a key role in making this happen in the years preceeding the passage of the 19th amendment to the constitution in 1920. Elizabeth Harbert was connected to the national suffrage movement through her friendship with […]

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This little news article is from the May 4, 1895 Evanston Index. It is hard to tell if it is meant to be comical or critical, but it certainly reveals the late 19th century debate over the changing role of women in society. By 1895 Evanston women had the right to vote for school board […]

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As early as 1876, Evanston was home to the Pro and Con Club, organized by Elizabeth Boynton Harbert (1843-1925), author and suffrage activist, for the purpose of discussing women’s suffrage. Harbert had participated in the founding of the American Woman’s Suffrage Association and was a close associate of Susan B. Anthony. She wrote the “Woman’s Kingdom” column […]

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From Evanston’s earliest years, women were active locally and nationally in advocating for women’s suffrage. As early as 1876, Evanston was home to the Pro and Con Club, organized by Elizabeth Boynton Harbert, author and suffrage activist, for the purpose of discussing women’s suffrage. Harbert had participated in the founding of the American Woman’s Suffrage Association […]

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