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Category Archive for 'Women of Note'

Lori Osborne, director of the Evanston Women’s History Project, was recently invited to speak on a panel covering the topic of Temperance and Woman Suffrage at the National Archives in Washington D.C. In partnership with the Sewall-Belmont House & Museum, the National Archives hosts an annual women’s history month event and this year the event […]

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Temperance advocate and prohibition supporter. Progressive. Straight-laced. Free-wheeling. Conservative. Radical. These words and more may be what come to mind when you think of Frances Willard. But they don’t fully describe her and in many ways get her entirely wrong. An upcoming talk at the Evanston History Center will tell the true story of Evanston’s […]

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Lorraine Morton

Wonderful post on the Shorefront blog with the story of Lorraine Hairston Morton, former Mayor of Evanston. http://shorefrontjournal.wordpress.com/2013/07/01/lorraine-hairston-morton-i-am-more-than-my-smile/

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A Tribute to Caro Blymyer Dawes

By Molly Kettler, EHC Archives Volunteer and Sunday Docent To visitors of the Evanston History Center, the accomplishments of Caro Blymyer Dawes (1866 – 1957) may not be as well-known as those of her husband, Charles Gates Dawes (1865-1951).  Charles would be the first to agree that Caro deserves recognition for her devotion to her […]

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The EWHP is pleased to share these very interesting articles from Shorefront Journal, the blog of the Shorefront Legacy Center which works to document the story of African Americans on the North Shore and in Evanston. Shorefront has from the beginning been an important partner with the Evanston Women’s History Project, helping us capture the […]

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When researching a prominent woman in history, often our first inclination is to look to her public accomplishments.  We want to know how this woman enacted social change, because after all, that is what we as individuals are most affected by.  But when we only focus on her social or political work, we are completely […]

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Our recently closed exhibit at the Evanston History Center included a feature our exhibit team worked hard to imagine and create. We called it the “talk-back tree,” somewhat following our “Lifting as We Climb” theme. We created a tree of plywood and paint  and put out post-its in leaf colors for vistors to write on. We […]

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This year marks the 100th Anniversary of International Women’s Day and this moment has a surprising Evanston connection in May Wood Simons. Simons and her husband, Algie, were Evanston residents for many years and were active in the early years of the Socialist Party in America. Simons wrote for and edited several socialist publications, including […]

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Mayme Spencer

Attorney Mayme Finley Spencer was Evanston’s first African-American female alderman. She came to Evanston in 1957 with her husband Warren, a doctor at the Community Hospital. Spencer was elected alderman in 1963 and served two terms. A graduate of Kent College of Law, Spencer practiced law for many years at a Chicago law firm while […]

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Kay Davis

Katherine McDonald Wimp (better known by her stage name, Kay Davis) (1920 – ) was a classically trained vocalist, receiving her Masters Degree from Northwestern University in 1943.  She joined Duke Ellington’s band in 1944 as one of his trio of female singers and toured with the band throughout the U.S. and Europe in the […]

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